Getting Up To Speed with Oursociety911 (04/24/19)

1st drug CEO faces criminal charges over opioid crisis

Former Rochester Drug Co-Operative CEO Laurence Doud III has become the first drug company executive to be criminally charged in connection with the national opioid epidemic, according to an indictment unsealed Tuesday. Prosecutors said Doud, 75, “made the deliberate decision” to ignore pharmacy customers who were distributing opioids for non-medical purposes, seeking to make more money for the company and himself. His pay more than doubled between 2012 and 2016 thanks largely to soaring sales of such drugs as oxycodone and fentanyl. Doud, who faces two conspiracy counts, surrendered in New York City. His lawyer said he would fight the allegations. The company also was charged, and entered a deferred prosecution agreement.

Getting Up To Speed with Oursociety911 (04/22/19)

Oil prices jump after report of U.S. ending Iran sanctions waivers

The Trump administration is preparing to announce an end to waivers from sanctions on Iranian oil imports, The Washington Post reported Sunday. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo reportedly plans to announce Monday morning that, starting May 2, all countries — including U.S. allies — will have to stop buying Iranian crude or face U.S. sanctions. The move comes roughly a year after the Trump administration withdrew the U.S. from the Obama-era Iran nuclear deal, which provided Tehran with sanctions relief in exchange for curbs to its nuclear program. In November, the State Department gave eight countries — China, India, Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, Turkey, Italy, and Greece — 180-day waivers to give them time to find sources to replace Iranian oil. Crude prices jumped 3 percent following reports of the policy change.

Getting Up To Speed with Oursociety911 (04/18/19)

Doctors in 7 states charged over illegal opioid prescriptions

Sixty people, including 31 doctors, were charged Wednesday with participating in illegal prescriptions of more than 32 million pain pills in seven states. Prosecutors said some of the doctors traded opioids for sex. A dentist allegedly pulled teeth unnecessarily to justify prescribing patients opioids. The people charged also included seven pharmacists and eight nurse practitioners, as well as several other licensed medical professionals. Prosecutors said the defendants wrote more than 350,000 illegal prescriptions in Alabama, Kentucky, Louisiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and West Virginia. “If these medical professionals behave like drug dealers, you can rest assured that the Justice Department is going to treat them like drug dealers,” said Brian Benczkowski, an assistant attorney general in charge of the Justice Department’s criminal division.

Getting Up To Speed with Oursociety911 (04/17/19)

Burned Louisiana black churches get donations inspired by Notre Dame

A crowdfunding campaign for three Louisiana black churches recently destroyed by an arsonist received a wave of new donations on Tuesday inspired by the reaction to the fire at Paris’ Notre Dame cathedral. The nearly week-old campaign started the day with about $92,000, but more than $750,000 in donations poured in after it was shared widely on social media. “These communities need to know that people care about them and what they’re going through,” Jessica Piombo, a California professor, wrote on the campaign’s GoFundMe page. “Every little bit counts.” Holden Matthews, the white 21-year-old son of a sheriff’s deputy charged with setting the Louisiana church fires, was charged earlier this week with hate crimes on top of the arson allegations he already faced.

Getting Up To Speed with Oursociety911 (04/16/19)

Measles outbreak nears record with dozens of new cases

The number of measles cases reported across the country reached the highest level in five years, with dozens of new cases bringing the number of confirmed infections to 555, according to updated figures released Monday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Public health experts now fear that this year’s outbreak will set a record nearly two decades after measles was declared “eliminated” in the U.S. Ninety new cases of the potentially deadly and highly contagious disease were confirmed in the second week of April. People in 20 states have been infected. A third of the cases this year have been reported in New York City, nearly all of them in a section of Brooklyn where officials have declared an emergency.

Getting Up To Speed with Oursociety911 (04/09/19)

Measles cases surge to second highest level in 2 decades

The number of reported U.S. measles cases jumped by nearly 100 last week, pushing the total recorded in 19 states to 465 this year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Monday. That’s the second highest total, after the 667 recorded in 2014, since the U.S. declared measles eliminated in the country nearly two decades ago. There were 372 cases last year. The CDC said the increase has been partly driven by the anti-vaccination movement. Most of the measles patients had not been vaccinated, and up to 90 percent of those close to an infected person can get the disease. “The numbers serve as a kick in the butt that says, hey, we probably should start paying attention to vaccination again,” said Ogbonnaya Omenka, an assistant professor at Butler University who has a doctorate in public health.

Getting Up To Speed with Oursociety911 (04/06/19)

Quick News, Concerning America, Current Events and Mental Health       I am an example of what is possible when girls from the very beginning of their lives are loved and nurtured by people around them. I was surrounded by extraordinary women in my life who taught me about quiet strength and dignity. —…

Getting Up To Speed with Oursociety911 (03/27/19)

Climate change

 The Arctic community that’s home to the “doomsday vault” may be warming faster than any other town on Earth. Longyearbyen, Norway, is the world’s northernmost town, just 800 miles from the North Pole. The Svalbard Global Seed Vault — where copies of crop seeds are stored in case of global catastrophe — is located there. But the climate in Longyearbyen is heating up faster there than anywhere else, a Norwegian researcher says, because of accelerated Arctic warming: warmer temps reduce ice and snow cover, causing less sunlight to be reflected and more solar energy to be absorbed. So the vault, which was supposed to be an insurance policy of sorts against disasters like climate change, is being threatened by climate change itself.